NMHR Staff

  • Durwood Ball
    Editor
  • Maria Hazel Mendoza-Jayme
    Administrative Assistant
  • Margaret DePond
    Managing Editor
  • L. Candolin Cook
    Associate Editor
  • Moises Santos
    Associate Editor
  • Rachel Cassidy
    Assistant Editor
  • Aleja Allen
    Assistant Editor
  • Angela Reiniche
    Assistant Editor
  • Benjamin Davis
    Assistant Editor
  • Ashley Flores
    Assistant Editor

To purchase the current issue, a back issue, or a single article and for more information on submissions to the New Mexico Historical Review please visit the NMHR website.

Department of History

MSC06 3760
Mesa Vista Hall , Room 1104
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-2451
Fax: (505) 277-6023

New Mexico Historical Review

Founded in 1926, the New Mexico Historical Review is one of the oldest and most distinguished historical journals in the country, publishing high-quality research on New Mexico, the Southwest, and Northern Mexico. For eighty-nine years the NMHR has published over three-hundred and fifty issues, amounting to more than one thousand individual articles by countless historians and scholars of New Mexico and the Southwest.

The NMHR offices have been staffed by editorial fellows from the history department since it came to UNM in the 1960s. Since then the NMHR has been a place for graduate students to gain skills in academic editing and publishing, while still actively pursuing their own research interests.

 

Latest Journal Issue - Spring 2018

Spring 2018 cover

In this issue:

  • "Student Activism, the NAACP, and the Albuquerque City Anti-Discrimination Ordinance, 1947-1952"
    by Lee Sartain
  • "Gaspar de Villagrá, primer historiador de la frontera de la Nueva España: Nuevas perspectivas críticas y biográficas"
    by Manuel Martín-Rodríguez
  • "'Birth control was just a part of it": The Santa Fe Maternal Health Center, 1937-1996"
    by Lena Mcquade

Excerpt from...
"Student Activism, the NAACP, and the Albuquerque City Anti-Discrimination Ordinance, 1947-1952"

by Lee Sartain

"On 12 September 1947, George Long, an African American student at the University of New Mexico, was refused service at Oklahoma Joe’s café in Albuquerque and sparked a boycott of local businesses that did not serve racial minorities. The boycott began a five-year campaign that resulted in 1952 in the passage of the Albuquerque City Anti-Discrimination Ordinance, which outlawed racial discrimination in the city. The victory was secured through a combination of student activism, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) branch involvement, and broad community participation, including the cooperation of white civic leaders and Hispanics."

To purchase the current issue, a back issue, or a single article and for more information on submissions to the New Mexico Historical Review please visit the NMHR website.